For the most daring and motivated women of San Francisco.
  • Bay Area Geek Girl Dinners

    Have you heard of Bay Area Geek Girl Dinners? They seem pretty awesome. I went to an event recently and they said it was pretty easy to go to them through the lottery system. Check it.

  • BuzzFeed: Pics of Real Rosie the Riveter’s

    I was once an extra in a movie where I had to dress up as a woman from the 40s. It was surreal, and after my hair and makeup was done, I felt like I had gone through a time-warp. Needless to say, I definitely enjoyed this post, and thought it may be fun for(…)

  • Podcast on Impacts of Visual Media from Bitch Magazine

    I love podcasts, and because we haven’t done an original in a while, I decided to include this one from Bitch Magazine. They women discuss how they deal with media that does not use women who looked like/resemble them and how they create media that they want to resemble them through art. Though I’ve encountered(…)

  • Working Women Leaning Back Infographic

    How long will it take for women to start leaning in?   Courtesy of: MBAPrograms.org   *Featured photo by Boston Public Library / Flickr.

  • #FollowFridays: SF Female Founders from Forbes Entrepreneur List

    Stumbled across Forbes’ article 20 Inspiring Young Female Founders To Follow On Twitter and figured a good portion of them must be located in San Francisco (of course!). Here are some of the female founders based in San Francisco from Forbes list. 1. Leila Janah  - @leila_ founder of @Samasource 2. Jennifer Green – @jenngimlet founder of @nomnomtruck 3.(…)

Podcast on Impacts of Visual Media from Bitch Magazine

Podcast on Impacts of Visual Media from Bitch Magazine

I love podcasts, and because we haven’t done an original in a while, I decided to include this one from Bitch Magazine.

They women discuss how they deal with media that does not use women who looked like/resemble them and how they create media that they want to resemble them through art.

Though I’ve encountered a pretty significant amount of discussion on race, I did learn a new term in this podcast; colorism, which is defined as “skin color discrimination within a race.”

 

 

*Photo by ksuyin / Flickr.

#FollowFridays: SF Female Founders from Forbes Entrepreneur List

Stumbled across Forbes’ article 20 Inspiring Young Female Founders To Follow On Twitter and figured a good portion of them must be located in San Francisco (of course!).

Here are some of the female founders based in San Francisco from Forbes list.

1. Leila Janah  - @leila_ founder of @Samasource

2. Jennifer Green – @jenngimlet founder of @nomnomtruck

3. Danielle Fong – @clarashih founder of  @HearsaySocial

4. Susan Gregg Koger - @SusanGKoger founder of @ModCloth

Happy Following!

 

 

 

 

College Women Opting for Hooking Up/Dating over Relationships

College Women Opting for Hooking Up/Dating over Relationships

A friend recently sent me a very interesting article from the NYTimes, surrounding the culture of the dating scene and how college women are changing the game up from perhaps a few decades ago. The author interviews anonymous college females at Penn and discovers that many college women prefer hookups to long term relationships. They say that long term relationships can be draining and that they just do not have enough time in their semesters, filling their free time with extracurricular, club, internship and sport activities that will help set you aside in the job market nowadays.

The New York Times reports:

“Typical of elite universities today, Penn is filled with driven young women, many of whom aspire to be doctors, lawyers, politicians, bankers or corporate executives like Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg or Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer. Keenly attuned to what might give them a competitive edge, especially in a time of unsure job prospects and a shaky economy, many of them approach college as a race to acquire credentials: top grades, leadership positions in student organizations, sought-after internships. Their time out of class is filled with club meetings, sports practice and community-service projects. For some, the only time they truly feel off the clock is when they are drinking at a campus bar or at one of the fraternities that line Locust Walk, the main artery of campus.

These women said they saw building their résumés, not finding boyfriends (never mind husbands), as their main job at Penn.”

I have found this to be incredibly true in my college experience and amongst many of my peers in general in San Francisco.  And at the same time I still have a portion of friends who have had a serious long-term boyfriend throughout college and the article addresses that perspective and situation too. But I wonder why Penn? Why didn’t the NYTimes inquire with other schools across the nation?

Overall I’m glad women are feeling less pressure to come out of college with an MRS degree. I also like that women are starting to become more competitive and focus on themselves first. Having a long term relationship can be draining, and even if it’s a great relationship, the two parties are still most likely focusing a significant amount of time on each other, instead of their own development. Of course those who are happy prefer it that way, and I guess you could say they develop together, which is a unique experience. But the single growth of oneself, and learning to depend on oneself is not necessarily guaranteed in that situation.  But hooking up can very well have it’s down sides, many down sides. It can become overwhelming and scary when there starts to become gray areas during hook ups, which, according to the article, can and does happen (read on!).

What are your thoughts on college women opting for hook ups/dating to keep their time available for resume building activities? Does it come at too big of a risk?

*Photo via gem fountain / Flickr.

Summer Reading

I am in the middle of Lean In right now, but it is my goal to do more reading, especially this summer.

My next book for summer reading: Unbowed a memoir on Wangari Maathai, the first African woman, and the first environmentalist, to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

I bought this book for a global peace studies class but our professor did not require us to read it in the end. I’m glad I kept it. It has four stars on Goodreads, time to get crackin.

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Meet Anne Wilson – CEO of United Way of the Bay Area

Meet Anne Wilson – CEO of United Way of the Bay Area

Anne Wilson started out as an intern with United Way of the Bay Area about 30 years ago. She never imagined in her wildest dreams that she would become the first woman CEO in 2000.

Starting in 1980, the nonprofit is part of the international charity United Way, but focuses and serves the seven counties that make up the Bay Area. UWBA is currently focused on cutting the number of residents who live in poverty in half by 2020, by providing multiple poverty cutting programs and uniting organizations together.

Mrs. Wilson and I touched on themes from Lean In, the challenges she faces balancing work and family life and inspires her on a day to day basis.

This is what she had to say. 

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Photo courtesy of United Way: Anne with Mayor Lee and Susan Sutherland, United Way Board Chair.

How to make it to the Top

Being a life-long learner was vital to Wilson making it to the top.  Taking on an always-learning approach to life will open up opportunities for people, Wilson said.  In her case it opened up a CEO position.

No organization is run by just one person, Wilson said, explaining that as the CEO, you need the ability to find and recruit talented people to work with. It’s important to keep the team energized, and make sure they look forward to coming to work every day.

“I have great teammates that I work with. We’re all in it together,” she said. “If there is a tough business issue, there are a number of very smart people I can work with.”

When I asked Wilson about “Lean In” and what she thought was the biggest factor holding women back, she said that there is not one certain factor that holds women back, but that it is more complex.

“I do think there are still real barriers for women in careers and in the workplace,” she said. “I also think there are resilient and talented women who overcome them.”

Wilson said that more women will be brought to the top when other women, who have achieved senior level jobs, turn around and bring other women up with them.

Wilson also said she thinks, more specifically, that the nonprofit sector has been more permeable for women.

I asked Wilson if she had any insight as to whether the Bay Area was perhaps one of the more supportive regions in the country for women to make it to the top.

Having been on the SF Business Times list of most influential women every year, since the first, Wilson responded by pointing out that, ”they kept expanding the list, in order to make room to recognize more women.”

Though it is not a solid indicator of the Bay Area uniquely catering to women leaders, it is definitely encouraging.

Balancing Family and Work

Wilson’s daughter was two years old and her son was eight when she accepted her position as CEO at United Way. From the first day she accepted the position as CEO, Wilson has had to balance family life with constant demands from her job.

“Every working person who has a family will tell you it’s the work life balance. There’s a series of trade offs and sacrifices,” Wilson said. “Being the CEO of any organization is not a 9-5 job.”

Wilson explained that she has had to sacrifice on both sides, missing some her children’s events for United Way and some work events for family.

Wilson recalled once attending a work and family event in the same night; the same night Wilson was to be honored at a Women League for Voters event, her daughter had a significant role in a single performance play. She ended up attending only the reception of the ceremony, asking the chair of the company to accept the award on her behalf, and then attended her daughter’s play.

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Photo courtesy of United Way: Anne with her daughter and husband at our 90th anniversary gala.

Every week Wilson prioritizes her commitments, and has to make trade offs.

“I will never say you can ‘have it all,’ I don’t believe there is such a thing as ‘having it all’,” Wilson said. “Both of my kids have been the last child to be picked up at school.”

And as much as it is important for Wilson to make family time, she also thinks that it is important for her co-workers to make and attend family commitments as well.

“I really mean it when I say ‘I want you to go to that PTA meeting or soccer game.’”

And though it means extra hours, the balancing act is something that every parent goes through, whether you’re male or female, she said.

Family life is also one way Wilson renews herself from her work.

“I do have an active family life. I do switch gears into being the mom and being the wife, and that is refreshing to me,” Wilson said. “It’s just a change of perspective which is very helpful. My whole life is not my job. I have other places -friends and family that are a source of fun.”

Wilson lives in San Rafael and often takes advantage of the outdoors, including spending time with her two dogs, “who are really wonderful.”

Watching the Giants is another way for Wilson to get a break from work.

“It’s a great fun escape! Even when it’s torture,” she said.

What Inspires You?

Wilson says that the mission of United Way is what inspires her on a daily basis. Much of the nonprofit’s work has been focused on poverty, with the current goal being to cut poverty in half by 2020.

“I’m very fortunate. My job -the mission- is very inspiring,” Wilson said, explaining that when she hears about a family member making progress after almost being rejected and receiving help from United Way, she is inspired.

“Families make choices every week about food, welfare, prescriptions. That is not okay. I am inspired by the work United Way and its partners do to make a difference,” Wilson said. “So I am the lucky person, because I get to work with these committed smart, talented people who are doing something that matters. I am very lucky that every single day I am doing something that matters.”

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Photo courtesy of United Way: Anne speaking with Tehmas Shaikh, a youth who received a job last year through SF Summer Jobs+ program.

When asked what Wilson would say to her 18-year-old self she said:

“I would say study harder in college. I would say, don’t miss the opportunity.”

“Follow your passion, find people who inspire you, follow them, become a life-long learner and be open to opportunities.”

“Keep learning and keep raising your hand.”

“100 Percent Men” – Tumblr blog worth checking out

One of my professors recently sent me a Tumblr; it reminded me that it still really is a man’s world.

Recently I’ve surrounded myself with so much work for and by women, (I interned at office of women of mostly women this last year and just accepted an internship at a media company focused on women), I guess sometimes -it seems crazy- but I forget how many businesses and organizations are still run by men.

While by no means am not a man-hater, (haha I love men!) I think that there should definitely be half as many women as men in the organizations on this blog.

Take a look, and let me know your thoughts in the comments below.

Without further ado, Boys Clubs (100percentmen.tumblr.com).

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photo via universityymca / flickr.